New Series Vegashitshow Documents the Return of Absinthe and Vegas Circus

Circus News

New Series Vegashitshow Documents the Return of Absinthe and Vegas Circus

In Las Vegas this past Halloween weekend, one of the most celebrated variety arts shows in the US quietly re-opened on the strip at Ceasars Palace, offering up their signature brand of dirty hijinx but this time with an extra heap of hand sanitizer. The Gazillionaire and the Green Fairy were reportedly excited to emerge from their respective hidy holes and join in on the fun and challenge of reviving the circus show in the United States, showcasing artists with revised routines, bejeweled masks and the determination required to revive an entire industry from the sanctity of their desert oasis.
They’ve done their homework, for example, they reduced audience capacity from 660 to 153 patrons seated in parties of two to five at sufficiently distanced cabaret tables spaced 25 feet away from the performers’ main stage. There are other precautions taken, cashless drink ordering, masks for performers and audience alike, etc. There is so much on the line for the industry which depends on the ability of pioneers of COVID-friendly performances like this to develop strategies that allow performances to begin anew. We asked Ross Mollison, the impresario of Spiegelworld, and Colton Hochhalter, Spiegelworld’s Chief of Stuff, a few questions about the process of starting the show back up. They also shared with us their new behind the scenes web docuseries, called Vegashitshow, which explores the joys and snares of re-opening the...
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Kim Campbell

Kim Campbell has written about circus for CircusTalk.News, Spectacle magazine, Circus Now, Circus Promoters and was a resident for Circus Stories, Le Cirque Vu Par with En Piste in 2015 at the Montreal Completement Cirque Festival. They are the former editor of CircusTalk.News, American Circus Educators magazine, as well as a staff writer for the web publication Third Coast Review, where they write about circus, theatre, arts and culture. Kim is a member of the American Theater Critics Association.